Enviva Wood Supply Map

Choose a supply area to explore harvests Enviva sourced from during the first half of 2016. Hover over points to view harvest details.

In order to maintain the privacy of Enviva’s suppliers and landowners, the points are placed in the vicinity of the harvest, but not the precise location of the forest. Due to agreements with a subset of suppliers prohibiting mapped display of harvest information, a small subset of forest tracts (comprising < 5% of total fiber supply) are not displayed on this map. Volume data from these harvests are still included in summary statistics.

Feedstock Origin — Enviva Aggregate1


43% Mixed Pine & Hardwood Forests

Mixed pine and hardwood forests contain both hardwood and pine trees that are primarily grown to produce pine sawtimber. These forests are either manually planted to pine or naturally seeded. Hardwood growth happens naturally through root and seed propagation.

At maturity, the forest contains mostly straight, large-diameter pine trees with smaller, crooked hardwood trees growing underneath. When the forest is harvested, the stems of sawtimber trees are sold to sawmills that make higher-grade solid wood products like lumber. The tops and branches of sawtimber trees and the crooked hardwood trees from below cannot be made into solid wood products, but need to be removed from the forest so the next rotation of pine sawtimber can begin growing. These harvest byproducts are sold to consumers of lower-grade wood like Enviva. According to Track& Trace, when Enviva sourced from the final harvest of a mixed pine and hardwood forest, an average of 30% of the total harvest volume went to Enviva and the rest of the wood went to other forest product consumers.

25% Southern Yellow Pine Forests

Southern yellow pine forests contain mostly pine trees that are grown to produce pine sawtimber. These forests are usually planted and managed for increased productivity and to prevent the growth of non-pine species.

These forests are generally ‘thinned’ about halfway through their growth cycle, meaning that some trees are removed to create more room for remaining trees to grow to sawtimber size and quality. These thinned trees are sold to consumers of lower-grade wood like Enviva. When the forest reaches maturity and is harvested, the stems of sawtimber trees are sold to sawmills that make higher-grade solid wood products like lumber. The tops and branches of sawtimber trees and any poor-quality trees that cannot be made into solid wood products are sent to consumers of lower-grade wood like Enviva. When Enviva sourced from the final harvest of a southern yellow pine forest, an average of 21% of the total harvest volume went to Enviva and the rest of the wood went to other forest product consumers.

25% Mill & Industry Residues

Mill and industry residues are comprised of sawdust, wood shavings, and other material produced as a waste product during sawmilling and other wood processing.

4% Upland Hardwood Forests

Upland hardwood forests are forests in upland areas containing mostly hardwood trees that are grown to produce hardwood sawtimber.

At maturity, these forests contain mostly large-diameter oak, poplar, and hickory hardwood sawtimber trees with smaller, crooked hardwood trees growing underneath. When the forest is harvested, the stems of sawtimber trees are sold to sawmills that make higher-grade solid wood products like furniture. The tops and branches of sawtimber trees and the crooked hardwood trees from below cannot be made into solid wood products, but need to be removed from the site so the next generation of the forest can begin growing. These harvest byproducts are sold to consumers of lower-grade wood like Enviva. When Enviva sourced from the final harvest of an upland hardwood forest, an average of 41% of the total harvest volume went to Enviva and the rest of the wood went to other forest product consumers.

3% Bottomland Hardwood Forests

Bottomland hardwood forests in lowland areas and floodplains containing mostly large-diameter oak, gum, and cypress sawtimber trees with smaller, crooked hardwood trees growing underneath.

When the forest is harvested, the stems of sawtimber trees are sold to sawmills that make higher-grade solid wood products like furniture. The tops and branches of sawtimber trees and the crooked hardwood trees from below cannot be made into solid wood products, but need to be removed from the site so the next generation of the forest can begin growing. These harvest byproducts are sold to consumer of lower-grade wood like Enviva. When Enviva sourced from the final harvest of a bottomland hardwood forest, an average of 33% of the total harvest volume went to Enviva and the rest of the wood went to other forest product consumers.

The majority of bottomland hardwood forests are working lands that require active management in order to maintain forest health, but some are sensitive habitats of High Conservation Value (HCV) that should be conserved. Enviva is committed to not taking wood from HCV bottomlands. To learn about how Enviva makes bottomland hardwood forests sourcing decisions, visit our Responsible Wood Supply Program page.

1% Landscaping and Arboricultural Residues

Landscaping and aboriculture residues include wood derived from landscaping and urban tree maintenance.

1 Enviva agreed to sell its interest in the Wiggins plant in early 2017. Therefore, the facility’s wood sourcing data are not included in this summary. This does not have a significant effect on these summary statistics. When Wiggins data are included, feedstock origin breakdowns are as follows: 41% mixed pine & hardwood; 27% southern yellow pine; 25% mill & industry residues; 4% upland hardwood; 3% bottomland hardwood; and <1% landscaping & arboricultural activities.

Feedstock Origin by Supply Area

Chesapeake

The Chesapeake region includes the Ahoskie, Northampton, and Southampton mills.

Mixed Pine and Hardwood 56%
Southern Yellow Pine 20%
Mill & Industry Residues 14%
Upland Hardwood 6%
Bottomland Hardwood 4%
Landscape and Arboricultural Residues < 1%

Southeast

The Southeast region includes the Amory, and Cottondale mills2.

Mixed Pine and Hardwood 20%
Southern Yellow Pine 33%
Mill & Industry Residues 45%
Upland Hardwood < 1%
Landscape and Arboricultural Residues < 1%

2 Enviva agreed to sell its interest in the Wiggins plant in early 2017. Therefore, the facility’s wood sourcing data are not included in this summary. This does not have a significant effect on these summary statistics. When Wiggins data are included, regional feedstock origin breakdowns are as follows: 20% mixed pine & hardwood; 37% southern yellow pine; 42% mill & industry residues; <1% upland hardwood; and <1% landscaping & arboricultural activities.


 

Map 1: Forest Trend Map

Data from USDA Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis program on forest area and inventory.

Visit the Map

 

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